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Scoliosis

The term scoliosis was a Greek word that means curved or bent.  Today though, it is used to describe the most common spinal curvature. Scoliosis develops when the spine bends sideways but also rotates along its vertical axis.  Most of the time scoliosis is idiopathic, meaning there is an unknown cause. Scoliosis is named according to where the apex of the curvature of the spine occurs. These curves commonly occur in the thoracic (mid-back) and thoracolumbar (junction between the thoracic and lumbar) areas of the spine. Scoliosis does not commonly occur in the neck.   Visible signs of scoliosis can include:    Head not centred over middle of hips  One shoulder appears higher than the other  One shoulder blade more prominent  Rib cage shifted to one side  Waist appears asymmetrical  One hip appears lower than the other Clothes don’t tend to fit properly   https://www.scoliosis-australia.org/scoliosis/about_scoliosis.html   Physiotherapy can help with scoliosis to help restore normal spine range of motion, muscle length and resting tension, muscle strength, breathing mechanics, endurance...

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Diastisis Recti

Have you just given birth and have been given a diagnosis of diastasis recti? Not to fear, you are not alone – more than 60% of women have this at 6 weeks postpartum and some 30% continue to have this even a year postpartum. If you have been given this diagnosis by your GP or OB with the treatment of tons of crunches or abdominal work, know that this alone may not always fix the problem. What is Diastasis Recti?   Diastisis Recti is caused by overstretching of the linea alba, the fascia at the centre of the rectus abdominus, the “six pack” muscles. Diastasis Recti can really affect anyone, not just those who have given birth but it is common in this population as the pressure of the weight of the belly causes the fascia to stretch out. Clinically it is most common in those who carry large babies or twins, have had multiple pregnancies or those who have tight abdominals before pregnancy. DR can continue to affect...

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Motivation for Rehabilitation

Getting injured is an emotional stress as well as a physical one. Rehabilitation can be hard and demanding, you must be prepared. There are many stages in the road to recovery and as everyone’s situation is different, this reflects in a broad variety of rehabilitation and treatment needs.  It’s important to stay motivated! The sudden onset of injury can have a large impact on your life, be it to family, work, sport or social life. To be suddenly incapacitated can lead to depression, being aware of this and seeking treatment sooner rather than later can minimise the frustrations felt and lead to a more successful outcome long term.   The 5 Emotional Stages of Injury   The same grief at the loss of a loved one can apply to an injury. It’s beneficial to be aware of these stages of grief, it will help identify your feelings, especially if it is out of character and at the very least it will reduce the potential of these feelings impeding your...

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Squats

Many times I have had patients come see me because they love to exercise, lift weights and do it on a frequent basis. Some of these people unfortunately run into some sort of pain in the knees, ankles or hips possibly due to some sort of biomechanical error or purely just overdoing it. A lot times, these people have seen previous therapists who have told them “You squat how much? How many times? You have got to stop squatting if you want the pain to stop!” At this point most of these once energetic fitness fanatics hobble out of their therapists office saddened by the news that they can never squat again. Here I am to tell you that these therapists are only half right. Stop squatting? Just for now, but analyse your technique and biomechanics to get you back there. But why should you keep squatting? Squatting is a great exercise. In every day life we squat to pick up our kids, squat to sit down on a...

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Neurodynamics

Everyone knows joints move and muscles contract to provide “normal” movement. An extremely important factor in creating normal movement, one that is often not assessed, is neurodynamics. What Is Neurodynamics?   A great scrabble word? Yes. More importantly, though, it is the sliding and gliding of the nerves throughout your body. When the nerves are unable to move freely it often results in pain and a restriction of day to day tasks. Importantly, this neurodynamic pain can feel very much like muscular and joint aches.   http://paragonphysiotherapy.com/solutions/neurodynamics/   It is assessed with upper limb and lower limb neurodynamic tests to assess which nerves are impeded, leading to the selection of the most appropriate treatment to facilitate normal, full nerve movement. It is really important to assess these nerves when a pain has persisted for longer than 3-6 months. After this time period the central nervous system becomes sensitised to pain, thereby becoming more efficient at producing a pain signal. Neurodynamic treatment should be a huge component of treatment for persistent pain....

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Vertigo

What is Vertigo?   Vertigo is the sensation of spinning—even when you’re not moving.   You might feel like you’re moving or that the room is moving around you. Most causes of vertigo involve the inner ear, which is also known as your vestibular system.  Other symptoms you might have include: nausea, vomiting, increased sweating or abnormal eye movements. One of the most common forms of vertigo is called BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo), which is an inner-ear problem that causes dizziness with head movements in a certain position. This can be treated with specific treatments done by your physiotherapist.   https://nonprofitquarterly.org/2018/02/23/vertigo-and-the-intentional-inhabitant-leadership-in-a-connected-world/    What to expect when seeing a physiotherapist for Vertigo?   Physiotherapy treatments for dizziness can vary depending on the cause. Possible types of exercise may include balance activities, exercises to improve your vision and ability to focus and exercises to help the brain “correct” differences between your inner ears.   Goals of Physiotherapy Treatment   Goals for vestibular rehabilitation include: Improving complaints of visual disturbance with head...

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